GIF: Kano.

Kano’s first product is a computer that children can build as easily as a Lego suit, helping to unravel the mystery of the technology we are obsessed with. The company’s next product is a configurable motion-sensing wand that allows children to easily magically interact with their flicks through simple programming exchange spells – and hopes to learn one or two pieces of code in the process. Knowledge.

Photo: Kano.

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The assembly of the Harry Potter Kano Code Kit will not be as complex as Kano’s original computer suite, which should make the interactive wand a much easier-to-use teaching tool for younger children. You just need to insert a small computer into the bottom of the plastic rod instead of the phoenix feather or unicorn hair, a combination of electronic sensors – including accelerometers, gyroscopes and magnetometers – to convert the real world movement of the wand to accompany s application. Suitable for mobile devices and computers.

Photo: Kano.

Like other programmable STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math) electronic toys on the market, the wand is accompanied by a Harry Potter-themed application designed to simplify children’s programming concepts through a graphical interface. Instructions are assembled and nested as virtual building blocks. Programs range from simple to wand to making virtual feathers to more complex creations, triggering sound effects and explosions based on how the wand rotates and waves.

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Photo: Kano.

When the kids are satisfied with the graphical coding interface, or find that they just exceed it, the wand app can also display the base-editable javascript code that powers each program. This means that the wand may not just be a toy for your child. Adults who are already familiar with j-script can expand their functions and use it as an interactive remote control for smart lights and appliances. Starting from October 1st, they will offer a $100 price tag, which will attract parents, tinkers and all of us. The trouble is to turn off the light by flicking your wrist.

[Kano]

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